About Harry C. Stutz

 

 

Harry Clayton Stutz
(1876 – 1930)

“But for him, physician none of this would have happened”

 Born:  Ansonia, Ohio near Dayton

Siblings: 2 sisters: Frances Almeda Brubaker (11 children) and Iva Stutz (had polio)

Religion:  German Baptist Brethren

Education:  Grade School – “A tinkerer”

 

Year-by-Year Highlights of Mr. Stutz’ Life

 

 

 

Harry Clayton Stutz, diagnosis circa 1892

1894:  At 18, he moved to Dayton and lived with Aunt Lydia Stutz and son Charles.  He learned machinist trade at Davis Sewing Machine Co. and National Cash Register.

1897:  Repaired bicycles at home located at 2404 E. 3rd St.

1898:  Built car, “Old Hickory” with 2 hp engine.  Married Clara Marie Dietz, October 25th

1899:  Set up Stutz Mfg. Co. to build gas engines.  Relocated to 703 E. May.

1900:  Built second car for transportation.

 

 

 

 

Emma Belle Stutz, circa 1924

1901:  Emma Belle born (she died May 30, 1992)

1902:  Sold Stutz Mfg Co. to Lindsay Auto Parts Co. located at South Street & Senate, Indianapolis

1903:  Moved to Shelby Street, Indianapolis, as machinist with Gormully & Jeffery Tire Co. & U.S. Tire

1904:  Salesman for Shebler Carburetor – brought Messrs. Wheeler and Shebler together

1905:  Built “Tourist” car for American Motor Car Co. using 4 cylinder by Testor Bros.

1906 – 1910:  Marion Motor Car Co., Chief Engineer and Designer/Factory Manager

1909:  Built Marion Pace cars (2) for Indiana Trophy Race at Crown Point – took 3rd.
– Placed 5th in G&J 100 mile trophy race
– Placed 8th in Wheeler/Shebler 300 miler
– Placed 5th in 24-hour Brighton Beach, Brooklyn, New York 1-mile oval track

 

 

 

 

H.C. Stutz in a 1910 Marion Racer driven by Adolph Monsen.

1910:  Marion Special roadster offered for racing.
– Toured European Auto Mfgs. in England, France, Germany, Belgium, and Holland.
– Formed Stutz Auto Parts Co., began selling Stutz Transaxle

1911: Built Empire Model 20, “The Little Aristocrat”
– April, began building first Stutz for the first “500”
– May 30, placed 11th with no mechanical problems.  Slogan, “The Car that Made Good in a Day” was coined.
– June, leased 430 N. Capital Ave., Indianapolis, Indiana, building to begin production.
– Ideal Motor Car Co. organized with Henry F. Campbell, President.  Built factor at 221 W. 10th St.

 

 

1913 Stutz Bearcat

 

1912:  Introduced “Bear Cat” for Stutz Motorcar Co.

1913:  Ideal & Auto Parts companies merged into Stutz Motor Car Co. (Indiana corporation) with Harry as president.

1914:  First building facing Capital built, Building A

1915:  New cross country record by Barney Oldfield
– World Champions in racing with White Squadron using 300cc, 50 OHC, 4 valve/cylinder
– Placed 1st & 2nd at Chicago & Elgin, Illinois, Minneapolis, Minnesota, and Sheepshead Bay, New York
– Placed 1st & 2nd in Astor Cup, racing 350 miles, averaging 102.6 and 102.2 mph, respectively.

1916:  Organized Stutz Motor Car Company of America Inc. (SMCC of America) and listed on NYSE
– Allen Ryan took over company.  Harry stayed on a President under contact for three years to July 1, 1919.

1917:  Stutz built own engine, a 360 cu, 16 valve, 4 cylinder with 80 hp.  Machine shop built and plant expanded.

 

 

 

1919 Stutz Fire Engine Company Heavy Duty Pumper

1919:  Harry left company July 1st and moved his operations to 1400 N Capital: Stutz Fire Apparatus Co.
– HCS Motor Car Co., 3001 cars sold.

1920:  Stutz factory expansion completed.

1921/1922:  Post WWI Depression

1925:  Married Blanche Clark Miller.  Divorced Clara and moved to Orlando, Florida.
– Emma married William S. Horn.

1926:  Grandson W. S. Horn, Jr. born.
– Developed 4 cylinder opposed engine for Stutz Bellanca Aircraft Co.
– H.C.S. & Fire companies closed down

1930: Died June 26th at Methodist Hospital
– Buried at Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis, Indiana, with Secrest family.

 

 

1993: Inducted into Automobile Hall of Fame, Midland, Michigan.

Automotive Hall of Fame Chairman Ronald Cutler, Hall of Fame President Gene McKinney, Robert Stutz and his son.

 

Information on this page has been excerpted from The Splendid Stutz, a 392-page hardbound history of Harry Clayton Stutz and the cars produced under his leadership.  To find out more about this book, CLICK HERE.